ASCO Members to Rally for Medical Research

March 25, 2013

ASCO and more than 150 other national organizations and institutions are supporting The Rally for Medical Research, on April 8 in Washington, D.C. The event will call on policymakers to make life-saving medical research funding a national priority. This unified call to action will raise awareness about the critical need for a sustained investment in the National Institutes of Health to improve health, spur progress, inspire hope, and save more lives. ASCO is proud to be a sponsor of this broad community event.

Advocates, survivors, researchers, clinicians, business leaders and members of the general public will gather at 11 a.m. on the steps of the Carnegie Library (across the street from the Washington Convention Center). For those who may already be in attendance, this will be held in conjunction with the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting.

For those who cannot be in Washington, D.C., on April 8, the Rally will be streamed live over YouTube. The link will be posted on the Rally website at http://rallyformedicalresearch.org. You can also take action virtually.

ASCO members can participate in the Rally in a number of ways even if they can’t be in Washington. ASCO will host a “virtual fly-in” on April 8,which will ask ASCO members to call or email their Members of Congress. Join ASCO’s ACT (Alert Congress Today) Network to receive alerts about taking action. ASCO is also encouraging people to get active on social media by tweeting members of Congress using the hashtag #RallyMedRes and posting on their Facebook pages.

Federal funding for medical research remains stagnant, threatening the future health of Americans and people around the world. The goal of the Rally for Medical Research is to unite Americans across the country to call on our nation’s policymakers to make life-saving medical research funding a national priority. This unified call to action also will raise awareness among Members of Congress and the general public about the critical need for a sustained investment in the NIH.