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January 21, 2020

ALEXANDRIA, Va. – A retrospective analysis of 26,768 young adults age 40 and under found that those who live in areas with lower income (less than $38,000) and lower education (under 79% high school graduation rate), as well as those who live in urban areas, had worse outcomes and a higher risk of death. The results will be presented at the 2020 Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium, taking place January 23-25 in San Francisco, California.

Each year more than 16,000 people under age 50 are diagnosed with colorectal cancer in the United States, and incidence rates among this population have risen 51% since 1994 with the sharpest increase among those age 20 to 29[1]

“There are a lot of disparities in health care,” said lead author, Ashley Matusz-Fisher, MD, Levine Cancer Institute, Charlotte, NC. “It is important to look at the sociodemographic disparities so that we can learn more and try to eliminate them.”

 

[1] JNCI: Journal of the National Cancer Institute, Volume 109, Issue 8, August 2017, djw322, https://doi.org/10.1093/jnci/djw322

January 21, 2020

ALEXANDRIA, Va. – A blood-based screening test using cell-free DNA to identify methylation signals of hard-to-detect gastrointestinal (GI) cancers that could potentially help detect cancer at earlier stages will be presented 2020 Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium, taking place January 23-25 in San Francisco, California.

“The potential of this test is to diagnose cancer earlier, when it’s more treatable. The ability to do that across cancer types could be quite valuable. Many of the cancer types that this test detects don’t currently have screening tests that allow earlier cancer detection before the cancers cause symptoms,” said lead investigator Brian M. Wolpin, MD, MPH, who is Director of the Gastrointestinal Cancer Center and Director of the Hale Family Center for Pancreatic Cancer Research at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston.

In general, GI cancers are difficult to identify early. The GI organs are deep inside the body, so small tumors can’t easily be seen or felt during routine physical exams. No screening tests are available for cancers like gallbladder, bile duct, and pancreatic cancer. Screening exams do exist for other types of GI cancers, such as colorectal and stomach cancer, but many of these tests are invasive. When GI cancers are diagnosed, they are often at advanced stages that are more difficult to treat. An accurate test based on a simple blood sample could lead to earlier diagnosis for GI cancers.

January 21, 2020

ALEXANDRIA, Va. – Patient-reported outcomes from two large studies show that quality of life is maintained longer with newer drug combinations compared with standard of care for the treatment of patients with a specific type of colorectal cancer and unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma. The results will be presented at the 2020 Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium, taking place January 23-25 in San Francisco, California.