January 21, 2020

ALEXANDRIA, Va. – A retrospective analysis of 26,768 young adults age 40 and under found that those who live in areas with lower income (less than $38,000) and lower education (under 79% high school graduation rate), as well as those who live in urban areas, had worse outcomes and a higher risk of death. The results will be presented at the 2020 Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium, taking place January 23-25 in San Francisco, California.

Each year more than 16,000 people under age 50 are diagnosed with colorectal cancer in the United States, and incidence rates among this population have risen 51% since 1994 with the sharpest increase among those age 20 to 29[1]

“There are a lot of disparities in health care,” said lead author, Ashley Matusz-Fisher, MD, Levine Cancer Institute, Charlotte, NC. “It is important to look at the sociodemographic disparities so that we can learn more and try to eliminate them.”

 

[1] JNCI: Journal of the National Cancer Institute, Volume 109, Issue 8, August 2017, djw322, https://doi.org/10.1093/jnci/djw322

January 21, 2020

ALEXANDRIA, Va. – A blood-based screening test using cell-free DNA to identify methylation signals of hard-to-detect gastrointestinal (GI) cancers that could potentially help detect cancer at earlier stages will be presented 2020 Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium, taking place January 23-25 in San Francisco, California.

“The potential of this test is to diagnose cancer earlier, when it’s more treatable. The ability to do that across cancer types could be quite valuable. Many of the cancer types that this test detects don’t currently have screening tests that allow earlier cancer detection before the cancers cause symptoms,” said lead investigator Brian M. Wolpin, MD, MPH, who is Director of the Gastrointestinal Cancer Center and Director of the Hale Family Center for Pancreatic Cancer Research at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston.

In general, GI cancers are difficult to identify early. The GI organs are deep inside the body, so small tumors can’t easily be seen or felt during routine physical exams. No screening tests are available for cancers like gallbladder, bile duct, and pancreatic cancer. Screening exams do exist for other types of GI cancers, such as colorectal and stomach cancer, but many of these tests are invasive. When GI cancers are diagnosed, they are often at advanced stages that are more difficult to treat. An accurate test based on a simple blood sample could lead to earlier diagnosis for GI cancers.

January 21, 2020

ALEXANDRIA, Va. – Patient-reported outcomes from two large studies show that quality of life is maintained longer with newer drug combinations compared with standard of care for the treatment of patients with a specific type of colorectal cancer and unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma. The results will be presented at the 2020 Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium, taking place January 23-25 in San Francisco, California.

October 22, 2019

ALEXANDRIA, Va. – A new study from the Levine Cancer Institute finds that patients with cancer who report higher levels of anxiety and depression experience more intense pain associated with their diseases. Furthermore, patients with higher social support report lower levels of pain. These findings will be presented at the upcoming 2019 Supportive Care in Oncology Symposium in San Francisco, CA.

October 22, 2019

ALEXANDRIA, Va. – A new study finds that oncology massage therapy can provide symptomatic relief for a common and difficult to treat side effect of cancer treatment. Patients with chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) experience a sustained reduction in lower extremity pain up to six weeks after completion of massage treatment when they received an intensive therapy schedule of three massages per week. These findings will be presented at the upcoming 2019 Supportive Care in Oncology Symposium in San Francisco, CA

October 22, 2019

ALEXANDRIA, Va. – An analysis of Medicare claims data found that African American and Hispanic patients who underwent surgical removal of the pancreas for pancreatic cancer were less likely than white patients to use hospice services at the end of life, though all groups were just as likely to use hospice late, meaning initiation within 3 days of death. These findings will be presented at the upcoming 2019 Supportive Care in Oncology Symposium, in San Francisco, CA.

October 10, 2019

ALEXANDRIA, Va. - Two blood tests show promise as screening tools to identify patients with cancer of different types and across different stages. Results from the two approaches will be presented at the ASCO Breakthrough meeting October 11-13, 2019 in Bangkok.

While the technology and science behind the two tests to be presented are complex, the concept is simple. Collect a blood sample. Screen it for cancer. Detect and diagnose cancer at an earlier stage.

While both approaches use cell-free DNA to identify molecular signals of cancer, one of the approaches also uses protein marker results. Cell-free DNA is degraded DNA fragments circulating through the bloodstream, which can come from a number of sources, including tumor cells that have died and released DNA fragments.

October 10, 2019

ALEXANDRIA, Va. – Genetic information could help identify patients likely to respond to radiation therapy and predict when disease recurrence following radiation is likely to occur. This could help clinicians better tailor treatment strategies to individual patients to boost efficacy, while minimizing unwanted side effects. The findings come from two studies that will be presented at ASCO Breakthrough: A Global Summit for Oncology Innovators, taking place October 11-13, 2019 in Bangkok.

September 3, 2019

ALEXANDRIA, Va. – Two studies examine different issues related to patient participation in clinical trials. One study investigates the relationship between participation in a clinical trial and overall survival in patients with advanced lung cancer. The second study discovers and explores a discrepancy between providers’ and patients’ perceived barriers to clinical trial participation. Authors will present their findings at the American Society of Clinical Oncology’s (ASCO) upcoming Quality Care Symposium, taking place September 6–7, at the Hilton San Diego Bayfront in San Diego.

September 3, 2019

ALEXANDRIA, Va. – Drug costs and requirements for prior authorization of treatment plans pose barriers to cancer treatment and can potentially affect outcomes for many patients, according to two studies that will be presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology’s (ASCO) upcoming Quality Care Symposium, taking place September 6-7, 2019, at the Hilton San Diego Bayfront in San Diego.

June 3, 2019

CHICAGO – The randomized OSLO-COMET trial found that laparoscopic surgery did not change chances of survival, when compared to open surgery, to remove metastases that had spread to the liver in patients with colorectal cancer. Overall, patients lived more than 6.5 years after surgery, regardless of whether it was laparoscopic or open.

The study will be featured in a press briefing today and presented at the 2019 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting.

June 3, 2019

CHICAGO – A study looking at 10,500 health records of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (aNSCLC) patients from ASCO’s CancerLinQ database found that the use of expanded clinical trial inclusion criteria, as proposed by ASCO and Friends of Cancer Research in 2017, would nearly double the percentage of patients eligible to enroll in clinical trials – from 52.3% to 98.5%. The expanded clinical trial eligibility criteria would allow aNSCLC patients with brain metastases, previous or concurrent cancers, and limited kidney function to enroll in clinical trials.

The study will be featured in a press briefing today and presented at the 2019 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting.

 

June 3, 2019

CHICAGO – A single arm, phase II clinical trial of 125 patients showed treatment with enfortumab vedotin (EV) – a new agent targeting Nectin-4, a protein found in 97% of urothelial cancers – produced responses in 44% of patients with locally advanced or metastatic forms of urothelial cancer. Patients had previously been treated with platinum chemotherapy and a PD-1 or PD-L1 immune checkpoint inhibitor, but the cancer had progressed despite these treatments.

The study will be featured in a press briefing today and presented at the 2019 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting.

June 3, 2019

CHICAGO – A recent survey of U.S.-based physician members of the Society of Gynecologic Oncology found that 64% of respondents experienced sexual harassment in training or practice; among women, the rate was 71% and among men it was 51%. Only 10% reported the incident(s) to officials. In addition, women were more likely than men to respond that gender affected career advancement (34% vs. 10%) and played a role in setting their salary (42% vs. 6%).

The study will be featured in a press briefing today and presented at the 2019 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting.

June 2, 2019

CHICAGO – A new study analyzing demographic statistics from the National Cancer Database identified multiple socio-economic factors, including private insurance, living in a regionally higher-income area, and receiving treatment in certain practice settings as being associated with longer survival for patients with multiple myeloma. Furthermore, researchers found that neither race (black or white) nor gender had a significant impact on survival.

The study will be featured in a press briefing today and presented at the 2019 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting.

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