January 19, 2021

On the eve of his inauguration, the Association for Clinical Oncology (ASCO) congratulates Joseph R. Biden, Jr., the 46th President of the United States. 

January 12, 2021

“Fifty years after President Nixon signed the National Cancer Act to make cancer a national public health priority, we continue to see its lasting impact on progress against cancer as demonstrated by the 31% decline in overall cancer mortality between 1991-2018, driven largely by substantial reductions in lung cancer mortality related to a decline in smoking, improved screening and better treatment.

January 12, 2021

Sean Khozin, MD, MPH, has been named Chief Executive Officer of CancerLinQ LLC, and he will begin his new role overseeing the continued expansion and implementation of CancerLinQ, ASCO’s real-world oncology data platform designed to improve the quality of care for people with cancer and drive new research, on February 16. 

December 23, 2020

The Association for Clinical Oncology (ASCO) applauds the decision by the U.S. District Court for the District of Maryland to grant a temporary restraining order on the implementation of the Most Favored Nation (MFN) Interim Final Rule. Judge Blake’s decision delays the model’s implementation for 14 days while she considers a preliminary injunction, which would further delay the model. The decision notes that there is likely to be irreparable harm if the rule goes into effect January 1, suggesting that the preliminary injunction will likely be granted.

December 22, 2020

Congress took a giant step forward to reduce health disparities by expanding clinical trial access to more than 41.6 million Medicaid beneficiaries through passage of the bipartisan CLINICAL TREATMENT Act as part of its end-of-year legislative package. We commend Congress for passing this commonsense fix to increase the diversity of participants in clinical trials, improve the validity of clinical research, and help reduce disparities in treatment outcomes for people with life-threatening diseases—disparities that have only been magnified by the COVID-19 pandemic.

December 17, 2020

The American Society of Clinical Oncology (the Society), an affiliated organization of the Association for Clinical Oncology (the Association), collectively known as ASCO, submitted an amicus curiae brief in support of motions in four cases to enjoin the Most Favored Nation (MFN) Model from taking effect on January 1, 2021. The Society’s friend-of-the-court brief urges the courts to stop implementation of the model, citing its devastating impact on patients. 

December 15, 2020

ALEXANDRIA, Va. – The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has elected Eric P. Winer, MD, FASCO, a long-time member and volunteer, to serve as its President for the term beginning in June 2022. He will take office as President-Elect during the ASCO Annual Meeting in June 2021. Five new members were also elected to the ASCO Board of Directors and the Nominating Committee.  

December 8, 2020

ASCO today issued comprehensive recommendations to guide the cancer community’s eventual recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic. By applying lessons learned during the pandemic, ASCO’s Road to Recovery Report: Learning from the COVID-19 Experience to Improve Clinical Research and Cancer Care intends to make cancer care and research opportunities more accessible to and equitable for patients in every community. Importantly, ASCO aims, with its recommendations, to address long-standing cancer care disparities that have been highlighted by the pandemic.

November 24, 2020

The Association for Clinical Oncology (ASCO) opposes the Most Favored Nation (MFN) Model for Medicare Part B drug reimbursement, which outlines a structured, nationwide, mandatory demonstration that will be phased in over four years, with full implementation for the final three years of the seven-year model. This plan effectively overrides a statutory provision under the guise of a demonstration project by imposing a new reimbursement model on cancer care absent any evidence that it can lower costs without negative consequences for Medicare beneficiaries.

November 20, 2020

Alexandria, VA — Julie R. Gralow, MD, FACP, FASCO, Professor of Medical Oncology and Director of Breast Medical Oncology at the University of Washington, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, and the Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, has been named Chief Medical Officer (CMO) of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO). She will succeed Dr. Richard Schilsky, who will retire in February 2021 after having served as ASCO’s CMO since 2013. Dr. Gralow is a highly respected leader in the field of clinical oncology with deep expertise in patient care, research, education, and global health. She will begin her new position on February 15, 2021.
 

October 21, 2020

As part of its ongoing commitment to addressing inequities in cancer care and research, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) is launching a new educational series focused on the role of social determinants of health in cancer care and cancer outcomes. The free series, which kicks off today, will help educate oncology trainees and early career oncologists about social determinants of health and their impact on patients and cancer care.

October 16, 2020

Oncology providers familiar with the American Society of Clinical Oncology’s (ASCO) guideline on older adults with cancer are two to four times more likely to conduct a geriatric assessment on patients with cancer over the age of 65, according to the first international ASCO survey aimed at determining if and how often cancer providers are using geriatric assessments when treating older adults. This is a noteworthy finding, according to ASCO, because nearly 70% of patients with cancer in the United States are 65 years of age or older, and globally, the number of new cancer cases per year among older adults will exceed 13 million by 2030.

October 5, 2020

During the peak of the COVID-19 pandemic, fewer Black and Hispanic patients with cancer used telehealth (including phone encounters and video visits) as compared with white patients according to findings from an analysis of data from New York City hospitals. Significant disparities in the use of telehealth not only limit access to quality cancer care for these patients during the pandemic but will continue to hinder patient care as telehealth use becomes more integrated into standard cancer care. The study will be presented as part of the virtual 2020 ASCO Quality Care Symposium

October 5, 2020

A study of more than 500 patients with cancer and COVID-19 at a large cancer center in Boston found that Black patients with cancer and COVID-19 were twice as likely to be hospitalized due to complications related to the virus as compared with white patients. Black patients were at greater risk of a visit to the emergency room. The findings will be presented at the upcoming virtual 2020 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Quality Care Symposium.

October 5, 2020

Black and Hispanic patients with cancer were more likely to be infected with COVID-19 than white patients, based on the findings of a study of more than 477,000 patients with cancer. The study will be presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology’s (ASCO) upcoming Quality Care Symposium, taking place virtually October 9–10, 2020.

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