ASCO-CAP Guideline Recommendations for Immunohistochemical Testing of Estrogen and Progesterone Receptors in Breast Cancer

Published in Journal of Clinical Oncology, Vol 28, Issue 16 (June), 2010: 2784-2795
M. Elizabeth H. Hammond, Daniel F. Hayes, Mitch Dowsett, D. Craig Allred, Karen L. Hagerty, Sunil Badve, Patrick L. Fitzgibbons, Glenn Francis, Neil S. Goldstein, Malcolm Hayes, David G. Hicks, Susan Lester, Richard Love, Pamela B. Mangu, Lisa McShane, Keith Miller, C. Kent Osborne, Soonmyung Paik, Jane Perlmutter, Anthony Rhodes, Hironobu Sasano, Jared N. Schwartz, Fred C.G. Sweep, Sheila Taube, Emina Emilia Torlakovic, Paul Valenstein, Giuseppe Viale, Daniel Visscher, Thomas Wheeler, R. Bruce Williams, James L. Wittliff, and Antonio C. Wolff

Clinical Notice (January 13, 2011): There are recommendations in the January 2007 ASCO/CAP Guideline Recommendations for HER2 Testing that must be reconciled with the April 2010 ASCO/CAP Guideline Recommendations for IHC Testing of ER/PgR so that cancer specimens will be handled in a uniform manner for the required testing of ER, PgR, and HER2 in breast cancer specimens. The points of reconciliation are discussed and summarized in a table.

Purpose: To develop a guideline to improve the accuracy of immunohistochemical (IHC) estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PgR) testing in breast cancer and the utility of these receptors as predictive markers.

Methods:The American Society of Clinical Oncology and the College of American Pathologists convened an international Expert Panel that conducted a systematic review and evaluation of the literature in partnership with Cancer Care Ontario and developed recommendations for optimal IHC ER/PgR testing performance.

Results:Up to 20% of current IHC determinations of ER and PgR testing worldwide may be inaccurate (false negative or false positive). Most of the issues with testing have occurred because of variation in preanalytic variables, thresholds for positivity, and interpretation criteria.

Recommendations: The Panel recommends that ER and PgR status be determined on all invasive breast cancers and breast cancer recurrences. A testing algorithm that relies on accurate, reproducible assay performance is proposed. Elements to reliably reduce assay variation are specified. It is recommended that ER and PgR assays be considered positive if there are at least 1% positive tumor nuclei in the sample on testing in the presence of expected reactivity of internal (normal epithelial elements) and external controls. The absence of benefit from endocrine therapy for women with ER-negative invasive breast cancers has been confirmed in large overviews of randomized clinical trials. This guideline was developed through a collaboration between American Society of Clinical Oncology and College of American Pathologists and has been published jointly by invitation and consent in both the Journal of Clinical Oncology and the Archives of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine.

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Last Updated: 1/13/11